TLFMagazine -Savour the taste of Indian Monsoon

Savour the taste of Indian Monsoon

Savour the taste of Indian Monsoon

By Muskaan Bhatia and Devyani Chopra

Finally, the wait for monsoon is over. Monsoons are a sigh of relief after a scorching heatwave and these showers have got us craving for some spicy snacks to munch during rainy evenings. The bond of garma-garam chai and fried food, specially piping hot pakoras is evergreen. 
But monsoon treats are far more than the fried food. Even though, we may have forgotten the origins of many dishes, this season brings together the rich and diverse flavours from all over the country. Given the diverse cuisine of India, there are several dishes, which are associated with monsoon indulgence.

Southern India

Eating spicy food is the best way to perk your taste buds during the rains. Food lovers in Southern India are no exception. 
• Kara Kondakadalai Sundal
Kara depicts ‘Hot’ and ‘Kondakadalai’ means ‘Chickpeas’ in Tamil. This spicy hot chickpeas snack is prepared in Tamil Nadu during Navaratri. However, this easy-to-make snack is enjoyed during the months of monsoon as well. The mouth-watering sundal is tempered with spices, mustard seeds, raw mangoes and curry leaves. Sundal can be made of other lentils like black- eyed beans other than the popular chickpeas version.

For the recipe, click here

• Mosaru Kodubale
Mosaru Kodubale is a yogurt-rice-flour fritter ring that is very popular among the people of Karnataka. In Kannada language, Mosaru means ‘curd’ and Kodubale means ‘crispy rings’. It can easily be made at home. As the name suggests, fine rice flour and slightly sour curd are the essential ingredients used in this dish and the grind paste of green chillies is used to give a spicy flavour. Enjoy this hot snack while watching the drops of rain falling down. 

For the recipe, click here

Western India

Variety is the spice of life and also the hallmark of cuisine of the western India. The monsoon snack which includes both vegetarian and non-vegetarian food, is famous in the country.

• Misal Pav
We all are well aware of Mumbai’s special Vada Pav and Pav Bhaji but misal pav also happens to be a proud member of this Pav-based family of Maharashtrian street food. Misal is a flavourful spicy curry topped with chivda mix/sev/ farsan which comes along with pav. It is a favourite in Maharashtra during rains which tingles the tongue. 

For the recipe, click here

• Choris
A Goan Rosary bead sausage, also known as Choris, is every foodie’s delight during monsoon. Prepared with a lot of vinegar, garlic, spices and pork, with a distinct smoky flavour, this is a delectable snack round the year. This delicious finger food is famous among the locals as well as the tourists. 

For the recipe, click here

Eastern India

East India happens to grow a lot of rice and green vegetables. Much like the rest of India, people there are both vegetarian and non-vegetarian. The speciality of Eastern Indian food is that it originates from Chinese and Mongolian cuisines. 

• Thenthuk
Thenthuk is similar to Thukpa in Arunachal Pradesh. It originates from Tibet. These are hand-pulled or bite sized noodles instead of flat noodles. This comforting dish is eaten especially during freezing winters and monsoons of Arunachal Pradesh to stay warm and cozy, it is like their comforting food.

For the recipe, click here

• Smoked Pork Stir Fry
This beauty comes from Nagaland, it is made with the infamous Raja Mirchi or Bhuk Jholokia, known to be two of the hottest chilli’s of the world. It consists of fermented soy bean and bamboo shoots, which gives it an intense smoky taste! 

For the recipe, click here

Northern India

North Indian food is full of spices to contain the flavours and make food crispy and crunchy. The monsoon delicacies and tea time snacks are something enjoyed by every north Indian!

• Samosas
There have not been a lot of people in India who do not know what a samosa is, in North India, this is one of the favourite snacks of people! It has a crispy and hard outer crust and is filled with potatoes peas and spices! Enjoyed better with pudina chutney and saunth which is the sweet orange chutney. 

For the recipe, click here

• Ram Ladoo
The infamous moong dal pakoras (fritters), which are called Ram Ladoo in North India, are made from dhuli moong dal. Meaning, these are made from yellow lentils and deep fried and enjoyed with pudina chutney and are a comfort food in monsoons! 

For the recipe, click here

So, what are you waiting for? Get drenched in rain and enjoy warm foods from all four regions around India and find out which one you like best! After all, experimenting with food is one of the things that make life exciting.