TLFMagazine -STRASBOURG

STRASBOURG

STRASBOURG

Built along the river Rhine, swaggering a 2000 year history and a town centre listed as UNESCO World Heritage, this eye-catching town combines convention with modernity and can be discovered on foot, by tram and even bicycle. Restaurants simply litter the streets of Strasbourg, some categorised amid the best in France. Genuine local specialities are best tasted in the ‘winstub’, Strasbourg’s typical small family owned restaurants. A particularly rare phenomenon - the production of beer and wine side by side, needless to add in Alsace, both are of the ultimate quality. For example at Au Brasseur on 22 rue des Veaux, a very interesting a micro-brewery, they create and brew their own beer and it is a great idea to wash down those home-made beers with ‘tarte flambé’ (flammekueche). With a tradition stretching back to 1260, Alsatian beer is universally recognised and enforces quality, consenting it to rival foreign beers. Foie Gras and Sauerkraut are the two centre pieces of Alsatian cuisine, but alongside these delicacies, many other mouth-watering dishes can be found on the menus. For example Baeckeoffe, and Spätzle which complement fish, in particular the famous matelote, poultry and game. For dessert after the sampling of the full flavoured Munster cheese appears a whole array of bilberry, plum and apple tarts. Not to forget the special cheese cake and the famous ‘kougelhopf’. All of these gastronomical temptations can of course be done if accompanied by the precise wine. Although white wine dominates, the selection is enormous and intricate owing to the Alsatian tradition of labelling the wine by the name of the vine and not the place of origin and leads to multiple variations depending on the soil, aspect etc. Riesling, Pinot Blanc and Pinot noir these are just a few of them. A must try are also the colourless spirits of the region from Gewürztraminer Marc to the significant raspberry, the range is complete and boons a spectacular conclusion to a lavish meal. An area worth mentioning is ‘The Petite France’, formerly the fishermen, millers and tanners district, today is a peaceful tourist district in the heart of the town. The narrow streets offer a wealth of half-timbered houses dating from the 16th and 17th centuries, gigantic courtyards and huge sloping roofs. All in all, this capital of Alsace is rightly famous for its delicious cuisine, wine and beer.